Dear MDU Family,

Today is a great day! Today, our studio will have a modified opening, an event that our staff and students have been looking forward to for 12 days during our recent voluntary closure to support community health.

We are pleased to share that our Safer Studio™ plans have earned the support of the La Crosse County Health Department which allows us to offer service continuity going forward. What does that mean? It means that means the plans and precautions we have put into place support our ability to hold in-person classes with modifications - even during “red”.

The response to our planning and communication has been overwhelmingly positive and we are pleased to be able to offer you two ways to dance this week:

  1. You can join us for in-person classes, which will be limited to 9 students per class; or
  2. If you are uncomfortable attending in-person classes, you are welcome to learn-at-home with our new live-streamed classes via Zoom. Please check your email for at-home participation zoom links to your classes.
The County has expressed their appreciation for our continued efforts to support community health by offering a variety of ways for students to continue to dance safely. After all, health is not just about avoiding sickness. It’s also about building strong bodies, minds, and hearts - something that happens in each and every class at MDU!

That said, you are probably aware that the number of positive COVID-19 cases in the County has increased significantly in the past few weeks. It probably also goes without saying that we are a school, and schools are going to experience reports of COVID-19 exposure as they welcome back their staff and students. The County has assured me that single reports of exposure risk will not require a studio closure. If the studio receives a report of exposure risk, the reporter will be asked to share with the County, any affected classes will be notified, and exposure-risk level cleaning will be enacted. The County encourages those with exposure risk to self-quarantine for 14 days from the date of potential exposure. MDU has the ability to monitor staff self-quarantine but does not have the capacity to monitor student self-quarantine. As such, parents will be asked to use their own discretion as to their comfortability returning to class or if they would rather participate from home. There is absolutely no penalty for absence and classes may be made up in-person (space permitting) or online (anytime). If the studio receives a cluster report of exposure risk, we will work directly with the County on the next steps.

Thank you MDU Family, for working together to minimize risk, keep our staff and students safe, and keep our studio operational. We continue to follow the highest standards of care and ask you to do the same. For a full list of our re-opening procedures please see attached document.

Thank you again for your support! We appreciate our MDU family every day and we can’t wait to see you this week!

Sincerely,

Misty Lown


COVID-19 Message Archive
  • 923 12th Ave S, STE 103, Onalaska, WI 54650
  • 608.779.4642
  • info@mistysdance.com
  • 923 12th Ave S, STE 103, Onalaska, WI 54650
  • 608.779.4642
  • info@mistysdance.com

Dance Studio Dress Codes: What’s the Point?

Dance Studio Dress Codes: What’s the Point?

 

Many dance studios require students to show up looking alike in terms of clothing and hair. Color-level leotards indicating mastery of certain competencies (much like martial arts belts) are usually expected, and girls’ hair must be in tight buns. These standards follow the dress code of the American Ballet Theatre, a national company that is a flagship institution for dance studios.

 

Student dress codes offer many benefits to dancers, and understanding those benefits will help when you hear that call yet again from your child’s bedroom: “Have you seen my leotard?”

 

Safety—Hair must be tied away from the face so dancers can see instructors and each other at all times, allowing them to read cues. Jewelry is minimized because if something flies off during practice, another dancer may step or slip on it, causing injury. Dance uniforms must be fitted to the body so instructors can clearly see the dancer’s form and technique, making adjustments when necessary. Proper technique protects dancers from injury.

 

Identity—When students walk into the studio, they get to leave behind their other identities and reinvent themselves as dancers. There’s a whole body of psychology regarding how our clothing impacts our perception of ourselves—ask any police officer, cheerleader or nurse—and the dance studio is no different.

 

Community—Dancers who dress alike see themselves as part of something larger. Watch your favorite sports teams. Even in warm-ups, they are all dressed alike. Simple, standard practice uniforms create a sense of belonging and community among dancers. They don’t preclude individual contributions; all dancers are still invited to be uniquely themselves. They do contribute to a setting in which each dancer takes joy in seeing everyone succeed together.

 

Learning—Uniforms reduce distractions and facilitate learning. When they’re all dressed alike, dancers are not feeling the need to adjust their clothing or compare their outfits to others in class. Focus and discipline are enhanced, and dancers can move in unison more easily as they see everyone else looking the same.

 

If your dancer has class a few times a week, keeping track of uniform leotards and tights can be a challenge. Get to know other dance parents and share ideas and resources for keeping your dancer dressed for success. Most of all, understand that the purpose of dress codes goes far beyond just looking cute.