August 25, 2021

Dear MDU Families, 

Thank you for a great kick-off to our 24th season of “More Than Just Great Dancing!”. We are now a full week into our season and it has been amazing to see kids and families back in the building.  

As the leader of our studio community, I have the great joy of seeing the excitement of the kids and teacher returning to class. I also have the great responsibility of navigating a continuously changing situation as it relates to Covid-19. 

Since the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic, MDU has provided clear communication and real-time decision-making. This has allowed us to offer continuous programming with only .0002% incidence of Covid-19 while providing consistent access to the benefits of dance such as physical fitness, social-emotional health, and mental wellness. That’s the joy part!

Now for the responsibility part. At MDU, we make all of our Covid-related decisions based on a variety of inputs, including local and national sources, as well as industry and studio data.  I wake up every morning, search the data, and track the trends. I also consult with our county, speak with other community leaders, and pray for wisdom.  I’m pleased to say that MDU is still doing extremely well in terms of cases as shared above. That’s why we began our fall season by continuing our summer policy of mask recommendation, not a requirement. Our community, however, is not doing as well.  The cases reported yesterday morning were double what they were the week prior and the 7-day average is one we have not seen since February. 

In my Welcome Letter from one week ago, I shared that we would escalate our policies if cases continue to rise. As such, beginning today (8/25/21), the following mitigation measures are being implemented: 

  • Masking required for students in preschool to age 11 while indoors.
  • Masking strongly recommended for everyone 12 and older while indoors.
  • Masking required of teachers while working with students unless in a private lesson. 

We will continue monitoring the situation week by week and will make you aware of any changes.  If community cases continue to rise, potential escalation of policies may include closing the lobby to reduce traffic, further limiting class sizes, greater physical distancing requirements in classes, and/or masking requirements for all ages.

In closing, I fully understand this message will cause relief for some and disappointment for others. Some will think it’s too much and others may think it’s not enough. This is the nature of the times we live in. But, it’s also in our nature to adapt and to support each other.  Our kids are mirrors of our reactions and emotions, so let’s focus on what’s positive!  In a time when our community is welcoming Afghan refugees who have lost all, we have much to be thankful for. Thank YOU for your support!

Sincerely, 

Misty Lown



Safer Studio Policy Archive

How to choose a dance studio

How to choose a dance studio

 

Motivations for signing children up for extracurricular activities vary from parent to parent. They may see it as a way for their child to learn teamwork, develop discipline, make new friends or simply to try something new. Rarely does a parent sign their child up for swimming so they can be in the Olympics or for soccer so they can become the next David Beckham or Mia Hamm, but that does happen, too.

 

Whatever the case, you want to be sure you’re selecting the best experience for your child. So when it’s time to choose a dance studio, rather than simply enrolling your child in the nearest opportunity, it’s worth some thought and a little homework. Even if your child is dancing just for fun, chances are they’ll be learning more than just dance skills. They’ll very likely be learning how to handle life.

 

So what to look for? Most importantly, you’ll want a studio that has a sound curriculum with solid instructors and a positive environment. How to find it? Ask several other dance parents where they take their children and why. Interview studio directors to learn more about the studio philosophy. Ask to watch a class. While it may be too distracting to have a new observer in the room, some studios will offer windows where you can see what’s happening during the class.

 

As you’re asking around, interviewing and observing, here’s what to watch for:

 

  • A studio that teaches children how to dance rather than teaching them a dance. Children need to learn how before they can do. Your child shouldn’t spend more than half of their total annual class time learning their recital dance.

  • A facility that is clean with adequate access to water and restrooms and—very important—proper flooring. Dancing on concrete offers little protection for your dancer’s body against the wear and tear on jumping joints and bouncing bones. Additionally, if you observe an unusual number of injured dancers at a studio, it may indicate a studio’s lack of attention to technique, not just bad flooring.

  • Instructors who offer individual corrections for dancers and break down the elements of a movement so dancers fully understand the technique or combination. Instructors who have professional dancing experience are a plus.

  • The 4 C’s of Age-Appropriateness

    • Class length and size—Smaller dancers should mean shorter classes. Smaller dancers should also mean smaller class sizes than older dancers.

    • Communication—Instructors who speak in a friendly way and in terms your child can understand.

    • Choreography—Children will have their entire adult lives to act like adults. A studio that preserves and protects childhood will teach your child more valuable life skills than one that seeks to sexualize them in any way.

    • Costumes—Ditto. Let’s let kids be kids for as long as possible.

  • On the subject of costumes, a studio dress code can be an indicator of excellence at a studio. Dress codes ensure appropriate coverage while also allowing instructors to see the lines of the body to ensure proper technique.

  • A positive tone that encourages friendly interaction, encouragement, friendship and fun. Children need positive role models and environments that will feed their young spirits; a good dance studio will offer exactly that.

  • A variety of class types that will allow your child to explore many different dance styles: from ballet, tap and jazz to modern, contemporary and hip hop. It’s a bonus to find studios that also offer master classes with guest artists. That gives your child the opportunity to learn new choreography and learn it from someone with a different teaching and dance style.

  • A studio that pays attention to level placements and provides progress reports is a studio that is paying attention to your individual child. It’s also a studio that allows children to progress at their own pace, which in the long run saves them from unnecessary injuries.

  • Remember that note above about learning more than just great dancing? Community involvement through their dance studio will heighten dancers’ empathy and awareness of the needs of others. And that instills respect and compassion that can last a lifetime.

  • Finally, a studio that offers performance opportunities to your child. When your child participates in tennis or track, you expect that you’ll get to see the results of all the hours of practice at a match or meet. Why wouldn’t you want the same for your dancing child? After all, dance is a performance art.

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